101 / Double the trouble 😈

A special font selection from the Fresh Fonts team.

Welcome to issue 101!

If this looks new to you, it’s because it is! As we announced last week, we switched to a new platform to send the newsletter from, and this is also why today’s issue is called “Double the trouble” — because making this switch was twice as much trouble as I had expected 😅 On the plus side, to celebrate, this month very exceptionally, we are offering two complete new font families to paid members, so there was never a better time to upgrade to our paid membership!

Enjoy! ✌︎ — Noemi

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Typeface of the Month

For a very limited time, get two new font families when upgrading to our paid membership — Louche and Hypertext Display 🚀

Louche by Domicile Foundry

Louche is a condensed, high-contrast display typeface best suited for headlines and short paragraphs of text. Originally part of Joona Louhi’s thesis project at Type Media, Louche started as an exploration into how a typeface could evoke a sense of italic without having an actual slope. The outcome is a fascinating typeface with unique modulation and rotating counter shapes. Louche comes in five, rather heavy weights, ranging from Regular to Black. My favourite character, if I’m allowed to have one, would be the ampersand 🤩

For a limited time, upgrade to our paid membership and get a never-expiring license that allows for the following usage:

  • The complete Louche family (5 font styles)

  • Use in personal and commercial projects

  • Desktop use (for up to 3 users)

  • Web use (for up to 10,000 monthly unique visitors)

✌️ Cancel your paid membership anytime, use the fonts forever.

Oh no! It’s too late to get Louche. Upgrade to our paid membership today and you won’t miss out on the typeface offered this month!

Typeface of the Month

For a very limited time, get two new font families when upgrading to our paid membership — Louche and Hypertext Display 🚀

00 Hypertext by DOUBLE ZERO

Hypertext (previously called Hypercube) is one of the debut superfamilies of DOUBLE ZERO, the new independent foundry of Malou Verlomme (and one of the best new type foundries of 2023). Starting from a very clean sans-serif, this font collection gradually evolves into more distinctive and expressive styles as the family expands into display, monospaced, and black weights — or even all of the above thanks to its variable font version. This month, Fresh Fonts members are offered the Display subfamily, which includes six weights with matching italics. With its high contrast, tight spacing, and sharp details, Hypertext Display was one of the most voted font families by the Fresh Fonts community — hence we decided to offer it to them.

For a limited time, upgrade to our paid membership and get a never-expiring license for a company size of maximum 5 employees (including you) that includes:

  • The complete Hypertext Display subfamily (12 font styles)

  • Use in personal and commercial projects (not transferable to clients)

  • Desktop use (on unlimited computers within your company)

  • Web use (unlimited website traffic)

✌️ Cancel your paid membership anytime, use the fonts forever.

Oh no! It’s too late to get Hypertext Display. Upgrade to our paid membership today and you won’t miss out on the typeface offered this month!

Fresh Releases

Gnarly by Formerly Known

Released by Formely Known, a design studio based in Los Angeles, Gnarly is a grotesque design featuring extended terminals and exaggerated ink traps. Particularly noteworthy is Gnarly’s uniwidth characteristic. Across all weights and styles, characters maintain a consistent width, ensuring no impact on line length or text flow when swapping the Light weight for the Black weight, for example. Gnarly is particularly well-suited for font animations, given its uniwidth design but also its variable font version.

Gramercy by Dinamo

Gramercy (from the Old French “grant-merci” meaning “great thanks”) is a beautiful serif incorporating calligraphic elements and more rigid genres and established proportions. Gramercy includes three subfamilies — Standard, Fine, and Display. The variable font allow you to sashay from one to another, and its second variable axis, weight, will allow you to wax and wane from Thin to Super. Worth noting, every font style in the family comes with two types of uppercase swashes: the OpenType setting that transforms all capital letters into their swash counterpart, and another one that only affects the initial letter of every word.

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Rhapsody by Off Type

Polymath by OH no Type

Today’s issue wouldn’t be complete without a geometric sans, and the latest addition to OH no Type‘s catalogue is definitely one you want to consider. Designed by James Edmondson with assistance from Colin M. Ford and Jamie Otelsberg, Polymath comes in a wide range of nine weights, across three optical sizes. These optical sizes include Text, Display, and another one in between, simply called Polymath, meant for multipurpose use. However, what makes Polymath stand out is its vast selection of alternates — of which my personal favourites are the “squiggly g” and “uncial a”. As the designers put it: “Designing with this typeface feels quite easy.”

Rhapsody by Off Type

New Kansas by Miles Newlyn

I recently stumbled upon the awesome work of Miles Newlyn, who runs a type foundry under his own name. It’s not his latest release but I wanted to share New Kansas with you, a beautiful serif with round and generous shapes, which evolve into an ultra-chubby Heavy weight. The family comes in eight weights, ranging from Light to Heavy, with three different italic styles: a regular Italic, a Swash Italic, and an ExtraSwash Italic. You guessed it, the two latter include swashes: Swash Italic in its uppercases, and ExtraSwash Italic in both its uppercase and lowercase characters. New Kansas has a satisfying texture when used for Text, and a friendly allure when used in Display.

LC Timáukel by Compañía Tipográfica de Chile

I don’t share “work-in-progress” families very often, but I came across Timáukel, which was designed by Raúl Israel of La Compañía Tipográfica, a small foundry based in Chile and Argentina, and well, it was love at first sight. As much as I love all kinds of typefaces, there is something particularly satisfying about a good serif — especially when it includes Swash Capitals. LC Timáukel is Dutch-inspired serif typeface, with calligraphic-inspired shapes, and lines that are more curved than its references would suggest. Currently in its first version, the typeface includes two styles: Regular and its calligraphic italic. It also comes with a wide range of features, including small caps, oldstyle figures, lining figures, tabular numbers, and much more.

Goods

I love these FWEMCO flip clocks that are now available from Actual Source.

These are some really cool posters.

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Disclaimer: the fonts and products featured in this newsletter are proprietary work of their respective owners. All rights reserved to the copyright owners.